Thames catch catalogue


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On this page I’ll catalogue my successes. I am optimistic that with practise I may develop better understanding of when, where and how to find sea trout, perch, pike and any other species that attack my flies. I have heard stories from the men at Farlows about salmon too. My intention is to document trends over time. Your comments are welcome – Enjoy the photos!

Tide schedules http://www.tidetimes.org.uk/
http://www.tidetimes.org.uk/richmond-lock-tide-times
Weather http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/

Catch number 1

anadromous salmo trutta up close and personal. Length = 53.4cm 6th May 2013 19h30 90 mins before low tide

anadromous salmo trutta up close and personal. Length = 53.4cm 6th May 2013 19h30 (90 mins before low tide)

Catch number 2

Thames baitfish caught accidentally on 19 August 2013

Thames baitfish caught accidentally on 19 August 2013 circa 20h30 on the rising tide.

Catch number 3

If one measures a fish by the number of casts it took to catch, this would be a world record! So much fun fishing the rising tide on 16 August 2014. Fly used was a Mrs Simpson size 12 long shank.

Perca fluviatilis – if one measures a fish by the number of casts since the previous catch in the same spot, this would be a world record! I had so much fun fishing the rising tide on 16 August 2014. Fly used was a Mrs Simpson size 12 long shank.

Catch number 4

17 August 2014 just before low tide. Leuciscus leuciscus - dace... These can grow to a decent size. I look forward to finding out more about them in due course.

17 August 2014 just before low tide. Leuciscus leuciscus – dace… These can grow to a decent size. I look forward to finding out more about them in due course.

Catch number 5

Day two, number two - I was amazed at how hard he struck and with the bend he managed to put in my rod! Notice how clear the water is, despite a downpour earlier in the day.

Day two, number two – I was amazed at how hard he struck and with the bend he managed to put in my rod! Notice how clear the water is, despite a downpour earlier in the day.


(Photos pending)

Catch number 6

Perfect poser! I love these colourful little fish... So do cormorants and grebes!

Perfect poser! I love these colourful little fish… So do cormorants and grebes!

Catch number 7

See what I mean about cavernous mouths?

See what I mean about cavernous mouths?

Catch number 8

Day two, perch number four!

Sunday 17 August 2014 Day two, perch number four!

8 responses to “Thames catch catalogue

  1. Hey Mark. I’ve bookmarked this page. Looking forward to reading about your successes on the water. Tight lines mate.

  2. Great blog, from Richmond myself and fish the Thames, not had the fly rod out as yet on there, but have a lot of experience of sea trout in north Wales

  3. Oh and a 5pm rainbow came out on a spinner at twickenham about 2 weeks ago

  4. Welcome to metiefly Nick and thanks for your kind comments… Was that a 5 lb rainbow? It is so exciting to think what lies beneath the surface of the Thames and excellent to see how the river is, for the most part, in such vibrant health. Kind regards – metiefly

  5. Charlie Druce

    Hi there, inspiring to read of your finding sea trout to cast a fly to in the Thames! Great stuff. I live Strand on the Green, just downstream from Kew Bridge. Going to have a close look at falling tide beaches below Chiswick Bridge, Barnes area. Happy to explore myself, of course, but any more tips gratefully received! Thanks and good fishing to you. Best, Charlie.

  6. Thanks for stopping by Charlie – the only advice I can offer is keep on casting! I have spotted a number of Salmonids at various times of the year – mostly in late spring and summertime. I suspect that the best times for sea trout are at night however I have not fished at night for them so have no personal evidence to back that up. There are a number of other species that could latch on at any time too… Tight lines and be sure to let me know when you succeed!

  7. Charlie Druce

    Thanks, Mark. Yes, suspect you’re right about night being best, as a general rule of thumb for sea trout. I had a first go with bass-type flies, fishing the flow just before low tide, very early last Sunday morning. No sign…yet! Surprised at how there is NO slack water at low tide on the Thames. Moments after low water, it reversed back up again. At this moment, so I read, the fish types can change…more sea species taking the place of fresh water ones. But a fabulous shoal of bream (I think…) moved in, some running big. Bream on a fly?? Maggot flies?! I’ve certainly had them work for mullet! I’ll keep trying, now I have started….be back in touch if anything takes!

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