topwater technicalities


A combination of deer hair and tightly turned hen hackle over an Antron yarn body gives maximum buoyancy and a lifelike silhouette… At least I hope so!

surface to air... This pattern is light and offers substantial wind resistance... Casting with the breeze will still extend the tippet and if the water is calm it should sit on top for long enough to attract attention!

surface to air… This pattern is light and offers substantial wind resistance… Casting with the breeze will help extend the tippet and if the water is calm the fly should sit on top for long enough to attract attention!

I am exploring new methods tonight and although these ones appear a little ragged and too wooly, there is enough of a result to push ahead and give them a field test. I shall enlist the help of a trout or two to give me honest feedback.

Materials make a big difference to the performance and durability of a fly. Whilst I strive for the best looking, hardest wearing patterns, I am sure this dry fly will not withstand being chewed! Time will tell, as it always does!

adapted from an elk hair caddis pattern, I chose an olive colour with roe deer hair to match the local favourite colours...

adapted from an elk hair caddis pattern, I chose an olive colour with roe deer hair to match the local favourite colours…

I look forward to reporting back once I have put these to the test in due course.

Thank you for reading – see you back soon!

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